Modelling science trustworthiness under publish or perish pressure [Review]

great article published last year by David Robert Grimes, “Modelling science trustworthiness under publish or perish pressure”

 

Grimes discusses the top-tier journal’s obsession with positive findings in their journals. This so-called ‘file-drawer’ problem discourages researchers from sharing results that are not ‘headliners’.

“32% of NIH trials remain unpublished after 52 months”

Parameters for initial simulations. Values in this table comprise the default initial assumptions, which are varied to investigate different conditions, as outlined in the respective relevant section.

He modelled trustworthiness compared with funding sources to find that it increases with the overall ‘trustworthiness’. He notes that conversely, increased competition on researchers seems to create conditions where false +ve and dodgy results are actually more likely to be rewarded with selection for publication! –

The impact of rewarding researcher for diligence. This improves the proportion of funding allocated to diligent researchers, but to improve science trustworthiness still requires non-zero values of η under this schema.

are you thinking what I’m thinking?

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